RFID Roll Labels
RFID Roll Labels
RFID Roll Labels
RFID Roll Labels

RFID Labels on Rolls

OnlineLabels.com now offers a variety of popular RFID label sizes for use in most popular Zebra® thermal transfer RFID printers. Our RFID labels consist of an attractive, white matte finish and utilize RFID chips from trusted sources such as Alien® and Avery®. These "smart" labels are the ideal choice for access control, file tracking, and many other closed loop applications.

Our RFID Thermal Transfer Labels are powered by the Alien® Squiggle Higgs-3 and Avery® AD227 RFID chips.

Our selection of RFID thermal transfer labels feature:

  • Coated white matte paper finish
  • Permanent adhesive
  • EPC Class 1, Gen 2 compliance
  • Ultra High Frequency (UHF) RFID chips
  • 96-480 bits of EPC or up to 512 bits of user memory
  • Compatibility with RFID transponders operating at 915MHz

RFID thermal transfer labels are commonly used for, but not limited to, the following applications:

  • Corrugated cases
  • Pallet placards
  • Apparel hang tags
  • Baggage tags
  • Shipping Labels
  • Asset management
  • File folder labels
  • Race timing
What is RFID?

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an automatic identification method that stores and remotely retrieves data via an RFID tag or transponder.

How does RFID Work?

An RFID programmer encodes information onto a tiny microchip within a thin RFID tag that looks much like a normal pressure sensitive carton label. This tag is attached to a carton as it begins its supply chain journey from manufacturing plant to retailer. RFID readers that work on the same protocol as the tag are distributed at key points throughout the supply chain. These readers activate the tag, causing it to broadcast high frequency radio waves within bandwidths reserved for RFID usage. These radio waves transmit identifiers that reference unique information about the contents of the carton. Readers relay the codes to a host computer as the carton passes through an RFID portal. The computer parses this information and makes it readily available to anyone who needs to know where a product is at any given moment.

What is an RFID tag?

An RFID tag is a label that has an RFID inlay inserted between the label facestock and liner.

More FAQ
What does an RFID inlay consist of?

Functionally, an inlay consists of an antenna and a microchip. The antenna drives tag performance and governs how well the tag will work in a particular application. Contacts attached to the microchip make the circuit between the microchip and antenna. The chip design features that can also affect performance. RFID microchips contain circuitry capable of handling a variety of functions from power conversion to data storage and retrieval.

What are RFID inlay antennas made of?

Traditionally, RFID antennas were etched from copper a relatively slow, relatively wasteful process. Today's antennas tend to be produced with more efficient methods such as etching or stamping.

How is an RFID tag encoded?

RFID tags can be encoded with a standalone reader/antenna setup. However, in a typical realworld application, that function is accomplished within an RFID enabled printer or printer/applicator.

How is an RFID tag encoded?

RFID tags can be encoded with a stand-alone reader/antenna setup. However, in a typical real-world application, that function is accomplished within an RFID-enabled printer or printer/applicator.

What is an RFID reader?

RFID readers supply power to passive tags and communicate with them. For these reasons, they need to be installed at critical points throughout the supply chain. There are also handheld readers.

RFID readers typically include several elements:

  • Digital signal processor and a microcontroller
  • Internal or external antenna
  • Network or serial port connection
  • Input/output ports for linking to other devices
How does an RFID reader work?

Readers emit radio waves. The antenna within the RFID tag receives these waves and collects energy to power the microchip. If the reader signal is too weak, then the tags cannot collect enough energy to "wake up.".

What is a passive RFID tag?

Passive tags are the most economical type of RFID tags and the most common tag used in supply chain applications. Passive tags do not have an onboard battery like active tags, instead relying on the RFID reader to provide the power that will allow them to broadcast their signal back to the reader.

What does UHF mean?

UHF means ultra high frequency, and refers to the frequency at which the RFID reader operates and reads the RFID labels. UHF tags are known for having longer ranges, and are thus suitable for supply chain applications. All of our stock RFID labels are UHF, with an operating frequency of 915 MHz.

What is an EPC?

The EPC, or Electronic Product Code, is the next generation of automatic product identification. EPCglobal, an organization leading the development of industry standards for EPC, refers to the EPC as a "simple, compact 'license plate' that uniquely identifies objects (items, cases, pallets, locations and so on) in the supply chain."

What are the differences between UPC and EPC?

A UPC only identifies object classes or generic categories of product such as a pack of Wrigley's Spearmint gum. An EPC uses a unique serial number to identify each individual pack of gum and makes it possible to automatically track products from manufacturer to store shelf.

What benefits does RFID have over barcodes?

The most obvious benefit is that RFID does not have to be seen to be read. Bar codes must be placed on the outside of the product and the product must be orientated so the bar code is inline with the scanner. On the other hand, with RFID, you could have multiple products inside a sealed carton and each product can still be identified. Another important difference is that RFID is a read/write technology. So if desired, the data can be written after it has been attached to the product. This offers a higher level of flexibility to track and update the data as the product goes through the supply chain, into the end use application or beyond.

What is the return policy for your RFID labels?

Any unused RFID rolls can be returned within 30 days for a full refund. Unused RFID rolls can be returned within 90 days for a partial refund. No returns will be accepted after 90 days. Any partially used rolls are ineligible for return/refund.

Are samples available for your RFID labels?

Samples are not currently available for our RFID label products.

  • Product Overview

    Our RFID Thermal Transfer Labels are powered by the Alien® Squiggle Higgs-3 and Avery® AD227 RFID chips.

    Our selection of RFID thermal transfer labels feature:

    • Coated white matte paper finish
    • Permanent adhesive
    • EPC Class 1, Gen 2 compliance
    • Ultra High Frequency (UHF) RFID chips
    • 96-480 bits of EPC or up to 512 bits of user memory
    • Compatibility with RFID transponders operating at 915MHz
  • Common Uses
    • Corrugated cases
    • Pallet placards
    • Apparel hang tags
    • Baggage tags
    • Shipping Labels
    • Asset management
    • File folder labels
    • Race timing
  • FAQ
    What is RFID?

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an automatic identification method that stores and remotely retrieves data via an RFID tag or transponder.

    How does RFID Work?

    An RFID programmer encodes information onto a tiny microchip within a thin RFID tag that looks much like a normal pressure sensitive carton label. This tag is attached to a carton as it begins its supply chain journey from manufacturing plant to retailer. RFID readers that work on the same protocol as the tag are distributed at key points throughout the supply chain. These readers activate the tag, causing it to broadcast high frequency radio waves within bandwidths reserved for RFID usage. These radio waves transmit identifiers that reference unique information about the contents of the carton. Readers relay the codes to a host computer as the carton passes through an RFID portal. The computer parses this information and makes it readily available to anyone who needs to know where a product is at any given moment.

    What is an RFID tag?

    An RFID tag is a label that has an RFID inlay inserted between the label facestock and liner.

    More FAQ
    What does an RFID inlay consist of?

    Functionally, an inlay consists of an antenna and a microchip. The antenna drives tag performance and governs how well the tag will work in a particular application. Contacts attached to the microchip make the circuit between the microchip and antenna. The chip design determines the protocol or class of the tag's operation. Different microchips have different features that can also affect performance. RFID microchips contain circuitry capable of handling a variety of functions from power conversion to data storage and retrieval.

    What are RFID inlay antennas made of?

    Traditionally, RFID antennas were etched from copper a relatively slow, relatively wasteful process. Today's antennas tend to be produced with more efficient methods such as etching or stamping.

    How is an RFID tag encoded?

    RFID tags can be encoded with a standalone reader/antenna setup. However, in a typical realworld application, that function is accomplished within an RFID enabled printer or printer/applicator.

    How is an RFID tag encoded?

    RFID tags can be encoded with a stand-alone reader/antenna setup. However, in a typical real-world application, that function is accomplished within an RFID-enabled printer or printer/applicator.

    What is an RFID reader?

    RFID readers supply power to passive tags and communicate with them. For these reasons, they need to be installed at critical points throughout the supply chain. There are also handheld readers.

    RFID readers typically include several elements:

    • Digital signal processor and a microcontroller
    • Internal or external antenna
    • Network or serial port connection
    • Input/output ports for linking to other devices
    How does an RFID reader work?

    Readers emit radio waves. The antenna within the RFID tag receives these waves and collects energy to power the microchip. If the reader signal is too weak, then the tags cannot collect enough energy to "wake up.".

    What is a passive RFID tag?

    Passive tags are the most economical type of RFID tags and the most common tag used in supply chain applications. Passive tags do not have an onboard battery like active tags, instead relying on the RFID reader to provide the power that will allow them to broadcast their signal back to the reader.

    What does UHF mean?

    UHF means ultra high frequency, and refers to the frequency at which the RFID reader operates and reads the RFID labels. UHF tags are known for having longer ranges, and are thus suitable for supply chain applications. All of our stock RFID labels are UHF, with an operating frequency of 915 MHz.

    What is an EPC?

    The EPC, or Electronic Product Code, is the next generation of automatic product identification. EPCglobal, an organization leading the development of industry standards for EPC, refers to the EPC as a "simple, compact 'license plate' that uniquely identifies objects (items, cases, pallets, locations and so on) in the supply chain."

    What are the differences between UPC and EPC?

    A UPC only identifies object classes or generic categories of product such as a pack of Wrigley's Spearmint gum. An EPC uses a unique serial number to identify each individual pack of gum and makes it possible to automatically track products from manufacturer to store shelf.

    What benefits does RFID have over barcodes?

    The most obvious benefit is that RFID does not have to be seen to be read. Bar codes must be placed on the outside of the product and the product must be orientated so the bar code is inline with the scanner. On the other hand, with RFID, you could have multiple products inside a sealed carton and each product can still be identified. Another important difference is that RFID is a read/write technology. So if desired, the data can be written after it has been attached to the product. This offers a higher level of flexibility to track and update the data as the product goes through the supply chain, into the end use application or beyond.

    What is the return policy for your RFID labels?

    Any unused RFID rolls can be returned within 30 days for a full refund. Unused RFID rolls can be returned within 90 days for a partial refund. No returns will be accepted after 90 days. Any partially used rolls are ineligible for return/refund.

    Are samples available for your RFID labels?

    Samples are not currently available for our RFID label products.

3" Core RFID Labels on Roll

Label Preview (not to scale) Label Info Features Compatible With
  • Higgs 3 IC
  • Frequency: 915 MHz
  • 800-bits of Nonvolatile Memory
  • Zebra® R110xi
  • Zebra® R170xi
  • Zebra® R110xi4
  • Zebra® ZT410
  • Zebra® ZT420
  • Higgs 3 IC
  • Frequency: 915 MHz
  • 800-bits of Nonvolatile Memory
  • Zebra® R110xi
  • Zebra® R170xi
  • Zebra® R110xi4
  • Zebra® ZT410
  • Zebra® ZT420
  • Avery AD227
  • Frequency: 915 MHz
  • 800-bits of Nonvolatile Memory
  • Zebra® R110xi
  • Zebra® R170xi
  • Zebra® R110xi4
  • Zebra® ZT410
  • Zebra® ZT420
  • Higgs 3 IC
  • Frequency: 915 MHz
  • 800-bits of Nonvolatile Memory
  • Zebra® R110xi
  • Zebra® R170xi
  • Zebra® R110xi4
  • Zebra® ZT410
  • Zebra® ZT420
  • Higgs 3 IC
  • Frequency: 915 MHz
  • 800-bits of Nonvolatile Memory
  • Zebra® R110xi
  • Zebra® R170xi
  • Zebra® R110xi4
  • Zebra® ZT410
  • Zebra® ZT420
  • Avery AD227
  • Frequency: 915 MHz
  • 800-bits of Nonvolatile Memory
  • Zebra® R110xi
  • Zebra® R170xi
  • Zebra® R110xi4
  • Zebra® ZT410
  • Zebra® ZT420